Martin Kaltenböck

How the PoolParty Semantic Suite is learning to speak 40+ languages

Business is becoming more and more globalised, and enterprises and organisations are acting in several different regions and thus facing more challenges of different cultural aspects as well as respective language barriers. Looking at the European market, we even see 24 working languages in EU28, which make cross-border services considerably complicated. As a result, powerful language technology is needed, and intense efforts have already been taken in the EU to deal with this situation and enable the vision of a multilingual digital single market (a priority area of the European Commission this year, see: http://ec.europa.eu/priorities/digital-single-market/).

image-languages

Here at the Semantic Web Company we also witness fast-growing demands for language-independent and/or specific-language and cross-language solutions to enable business cases like cross-lingual search or multilingual data management approaches. To provide such solutions, a multilingual metadata and data management approach is needed, and this is where PoolParty Semantic Suite comes into the game: as PoolParty follows W3C semantic web standards like SKOS, we have language-independent-based technologies in place and our customers already benefit from them. However, as regards text analysis and text extraction, the ability to process multilingual information and data is key for success – which means that the systems need to speak as many languages as possible.

Continue reading

Florian Huber

Using SPARQL clause VALUES in PoolParty

connect-sparqlSince PoolParty fully supports SPARQL 1.1 functionalities you can use clauses like VALUES. The VALUES clause can be used to provide an unordered solution sequence that is joined with the results of the query evaluation. From my perspective it is a convenience of filtering variables and an increase in readability of queries.

E.g. when you want to know which cocktails you can create with Gin and a highball glass you can go to http://vocabulary.semantic-web.at/PoolParty/sparql/cocktails and fire this query: Continue reading

Tassilo Pellegrini

Thoughts on KOS (Part 2): Classifying Knowledge Organisation Systems

Traditional KOSs include a broad range of system types from term lists to classification systems and thesauri. These organization systems vary in functional purpose and semantic expressivity. Most of these traditional KOSs were developed in a print and library environment. They have been used to control the vocabulary used when indexing and searching a specific product, such as a bibliographic database, or when organizing a physical collection such as a library (Hodge et al. 2000). Continue reading