Andreas Blumauer

Linked data based search: Make use of linked data to provide means for complex queries

Two live demos of PoolParty Semantic Integrator demonstrate new ways to retrieve information based on linked data technologies

data visualisation

Linked data graphs can be used to annotate and categorize documents. By transforming text into RDF graphs and linking them with LOD like DBpedia, Geonames, MeSH etc. completely new ways to make queries over large document repositories become possible.

An online-demo illustrates those principles: Imagine you were an information officer at the Global Health Observatory of the World Health Organisation. You inform policy makers about the global situation in specific disease areas to direct support to the required health support programs. For your research you need data about disease prevalence in relation with socioeconomic factors.

Datasets and technology

About 160.000 scientific abstracts from PubMed, linked to three different disease categories were collected. Abstracts were automatically annotated with PoolParty Extractor, based on terms from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and Geonames that are organized in a SKOS thesaurus, managed with PoolParty Thesaurus Server. Abstracts were transformed to RDF and stored in Virtuoso RDF store. In the next step, it is easy to combine these data sets within the triple store with large linked data sources like DBPedia, Geonames or Yago. The use of linked data makes it easy to e.g. group annotated countries by the Human Development Index (HDI). The hierarchical structure of the thesaurus was used to collect all concepts that are connected to a specific disease.

This demo was developed based on the libraries sgvizler to visualize SPARQL results. AngularJS was used to dynamically replace variables in SPARQL query templates.

Another example of linked data based search in the field of renewable energy can be tried out here.

Links:

Andreas Blumauer

Webinar: Semantic Web for Developers

GotoWebinar, March 20: Semantic Web for Developers – building semantic applications with PoolParty

This webinar gives insights into software development based on semantic web standards. We will give a short overview over frequently used standards (SPARQL, SKOS and RDF), application scenarios and technologies (OpenRDF, Virtuoso, Solr/Lucene) and we will give live-demos on how to make use of PoolParty technologies to build a variety of semantic applications.

Part 1 (15min):
Short introduction to semantic web and linked data standards, overview over typical application scenarios

Part 2 (30min):
PoolParty architecture, components and APIs: making use of the linked data front end, Sparql endpoint, PoolParty reports, thesaurus API (PPT API), extractor API (PPX API) and semantic search API (PPS API) -  for each API, an example will be shown (incl. returned formats and how to make use of it in a programming language like PHP)

Part 3 (10min):
Putting the pieces together: Combine the APIs to build

- a semantic search engine
- a content recommender
- a linked data mashup

Part 4 (min. 5min):
Questions and answering

Register now: https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/774130327

Andreas Blumauer

SKOS without SPARQL

Today PoolParty Team has announced the first official release of the PoolParty SKOS API.

This API can be installed in addition to a PoolParty Thesaurus Server 3.2 and offers an easy way to programmatically access data of a SKOS thesaurus via RESTful services. The SKOS API can be used without any knowledge about SPARQL .

This first release of the API offers web services to access thesaurus projects, concept schemes, concepts and SPARQL lists. In addition to basic SKOS querying, the API also supports the import of RDF data, SPARQL update and a service to push candidate terms into a thesaurus project triggered by any kind of application (like a CMS or a wiki).

Learn more about the PoolParty SKOS API.

Andreas Blumauer

Education Services Australia announces new release of Schools Online Thesaurus

Education Services Australia has recently announced the release of Schools Online Thesaurus (ScOT) v6.7.
ScOT and agreed standards for digital resources, technical infrastructure, metadata and rights management support a national operating environment for the digital resources and infrastructure.
As part of this infrastructure, the National Digital Learning Resources Network contains over 12,000 digital resources that are free for use in all Australian schools. The resources are made available to teachers through State and Territory portals or Scootle and to pre-service teachers through eContent.
Version 6.7 has made possible by a recent addition to the ScOT project team. Ben Chadwick has undertaken a Vocabulary Support role since January 2012 and his work with web-services, data mining and thesaurus editing has contributed to the delivery of a substantial body of work.

Significant steps have been taken in the area of non-English labels, especially the addition of Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese and Korean term translations. Other preliminary work, including development of language and character encoding support, facilitates translations in Arabic, Māori and other languages. A sample concept can be found at http://vocabulary.curriculum.edu.au/scot/976

This represents a substantial opportunity for ScOT to support users who are learning or who have a background in languages other than English. Online environments can be designed or adapted to take advantage of standardised language encoding and character support.
A number of new features and improvements have been developed in the ScOT website:
  • User generated reports – lists new, modified and deprecated terms
  • Cataloguing tool – quickly identifies hierarchical relationships within a group of terms
  • Linked Data API for querying ScOT database: SPARQL Endpoint
  • Tips and code examples for developing search tools and managing term changes
  • Revised license and simplified registration process
  • Auto-complete feature for searching ScOT
  • Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) – range of issues identified and fixed
The associated report can be accessed from the ScOT website releases page http://scot.curriculum.edu.au/releases.asp.
ScOT is based on PoolParty technologies.